LSC Alum Jubran Jindeel Presents Lyme Disease Research at National Biomedical Conference

Jubran Jindeel, a recent Lake Superior College graduate and current University of Minnesota Duluth student, represented the college at the annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), the largest student-focused biomedical conference in North America.


Left to right: Lake Superior College Bridges to Baccalaureate Program Coordinator Terrence Wilcox at the annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) with LSC Bridges to Baccalaureate degree program alum student Jubran Jindeel.

Jindeel is a trainee in the Bridges to Baccalaureate degree program, a two-year science research training program he started while at LSC. Funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the “Bridges” program is coordinated in partnership with the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus.

Jindeel presented research on Lyme disease, a bacterial infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, a spirochete transmitted by Ixodes scapularis (Deer Ticks) in North America. He is developing a DNA test on whole ticks collected from northern Minnesota to determine if they carry the Borrelia bacteria. The multiplex test will be able to determine 1. If the tick is carrying Borrelia bacteria, and 2. What genospecies of Borrelia bacteria was in the tick. The data will be used to build a map of high-risk areas for developing Lyme disease in Minnesota and northern Wisconsin. He presented his research project in a poster session.

“We are proud of Jubran and his research presentation on Lyme disease,” said Terrence Wilcox, LSC biology faculty member and Bridges to Baccalaureate program coordinator. “We appreciate the productive partnership we have with UMD’s Biomedical Sciences Department.”

LSC students have the opportunity to participate in the Bridges to Baccalaureate degree program, a two-year science research training program. Funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the Bridges program is coordinated in partnership with the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus. The undergraduate students work on biomedical research projects and are mentored by UMD faculty. The “Bridges” program provides professional development activities and an appointment as a paid research assistant. Trainees participate for 10 weeks of full-time employment during the summer, and part-time employment at 15 hours per week during the academic year. The role of the program is to develop a pipeline for LSC students to pursue biomedical research careers. Since the program inception in 1995, there have been more than 90 LSC students who have participated in training with many of these students progressing on to graduate school or medical school.

The ABRCMS biomedical conference includes approximately 4,000 undergraduate and post-baccalaureate student participants who represented 12 disciplines in STEM fields and presented their research by either a poster or an oral presentation. All students’ presentations were judged and those receiving the highest scores in each scientific discipline were given an award.